Large health inequalities across England revealed

New report shows there are stark differences in how long people in different parts of England can expect to live a healthy life. | ONS | via Cancer Research UK

tree-1706648_1920

report from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) shows that people in areas with the highest healthy life expectancy will live longer without health problems than people in areas with the lowest expectancy.

Life expectancy in England has been increasing consistently since 1951, but varies by location. Men living in the least deprived areas live on average 9.2 years longer than men living in the most deprived areas. For women this gap is 7.1 years. There is an even greater difference in the quality of those years lived. Healthy life expectancy (HLE), or the number of years one could expect to live in good health, in England is 64.1 years for women and 63.4 for men.

Men living in the most deprived areas of England can expect to lead a healthy life for nearly 19 years less than men living in the least deprived.  The difference for women is 19.6 years. Heath inequalities between the north and south of England were also highlighted, as 6 of the top 7 areas with the highest healthy life expectancy were in the south, and all of the top 6 areas with the lowest expectancy were in the north.

The report looked at information on health-related lifestyle factors such as smoking, obesity, physical activity and diet.

Full report: An overview of lifestyles and wider characteristics linked to Healthy Life  Expectancy in England: June 2017 | ONS

Advertisements

What makes us healthy?

The Health Foundation has published What makes us healthy?

This infographic is part of a new series of infographics and accompanying blogs and commentaries to describe and explain the social determinants of health in an accessible and engaging way. This infographic shows the extent to which health is primarily shaped by factors outside the direct influence of healthcare and invites people to look at this bigger picture.

Improving air quality across England

Councils should do more to enforce no vehicle idling outside schools, hospitals, and care homes, to protect the vulnerable from the harmful effects of air pollution and improve air quality across England. | NICE | Public Health England | via OnMedica

exhaust-517799_1920

Joint guidance issued today from NICE and Public Health England (PHE) suggests bylaws to enforce engine switch-off while cars are stationary could help protect the vulnerable from the harmful effects of air pollution.

Air pollution is harmful to everyone, but some people are more at risk than others, it says: children and young teens and older people are more susceptible, as are those with respiratory conditions or heart problems. PHE estimate long-term exposure to particulate air pollution has ‘an effect equivalent to’ around 25,000 deaths a year in England, making air pollution the largest environmental risk linked to deaths every year. The health impact of air pollution caused by human activities in the UK is thought to cost between £8.5 and £18.6 billion a year.

Full story at OnMedica

Download the guidance: Air pollution: outdoor air quality and health

A closer look at perinatal depression

pregnancy-1905645_1920

Postnatal depression affects around 1 in 10 women and not only impacts on the wellbeing of the mother, but can also have long term impacts on the mental and physical health of the infant.

The authors of this Lancet paper are from the Postpartum Depression: Action Towards Causes and Treatment (PACT) consortium. This is an international group who aim to gather information about PND to explore a number of questions, including whether there are distinguishable subtypes of PND which might be relevant for treatment and prognosis, in particular taking into account comorbid anxiety.

In this post via The Mental Elf, Jill Domoney looks at the methods and results of this paper, the authors of which believe has created “an important hypothesis-generating foundation for future work”.

Full reference to the research: Putman K et al. (2017) Clinical phenotypes of perinatal depression and time of symptom onset: analysis of data from an International Consortium. Lancet Psychiatry 4(6) 477-485.

Start active, stay active

The Department of Health has produced a series of infographics as part of it’s ‘Start active, stay active’ series explaining the physical activity required to achieve general health benefits for different age ranges.

forest-662427_1920The following infographics relate to the report by the UK’s 4 Chief Medical Officers for the NHS, local authorities and a range of other organisations designing services to promote physical activity.

Physical activity for pregnant women

Physical activity benefits for babies and children (birth-5 years old)

Physical activity for children and young people (5-18 years old)

Physical activity benefits infographic for adults and older people

National child measurement programme operational guidance

Guidance for local commissioners, providers and schools on running the national child measurement programme (NCMP) as part of the government’s commitment to tackling the public health challenge of excess weight.

tape-measure-2406650_1920 (1)

The publication of the Childhood Obesity Plan: A Plan for Action, in August 2016 shows that tackling child obesity is a priority for the Government. The plan aims to significantly reduce England’s rate of childhood obesity within the next ten years. Most local authorities have also identified addressing childhood obesity as a key issue in their health and wellbeing strategies, and reducing obesity is prioritised in many Sustainability and Transformation Plans.

The NCMP is key to monitoring the progress of the Government’s Childhood Obesity Plan. It provides the data for the Public Health Outcomes Framework indicators on “excess weight in children aged four to five years and ten to 11 years.” Because the data is valid at local level, it can also be used to inform the development and monitoring of local childhood obesity strategies.

National child measurement programme operational guidance

National child measurement programme: information for schools

UK heart disease deaths fall by over 20% since indoor smoking ban

Smokers aged 35 and above are less likely to die from heart attacks since indoor venues went smoke-free 10 years ago | The Guardian

boxing-156810_960_720

Deaths from heart disease and strokes caused by smoking have fallen dramatically since lighting up in pubs, restaurants and other enclosed public places in England was banned 10 years ago.

New figures have shown that the number of smokers aged 35 and over dying from heart attacks and other cardiac conditions has dropped by over 20% since 2007 while fatalities from a stroke are almost 14% down.

The statistics, which Public Health England (PHE) has shared with the Guardian, come as medical, public health and anti-tobacco groups prepare to mark the 10th anniversary next Friday of smoking being prohibited in indoor public places by Tony Blair’s Labour government on 1 July 2007.

Figures collected by PHE’s Local Tobacco Control Profiles network show that while there were 32,548 deaths from heart disease attributable to smoking in 2007-09, there were 25,777 between 2013 and 2015 – a fall of 20.8%. Similarly, a total of 9,743 smokers died from a stroke in 2007-09, but fewer – 8,334 – between 2013 and 2015, a drop of 14.5%.

Read the full news story here