Health economics: a guide for public health teams

Updated resources to help local commissioners achieve value for money by estimating the return on investment (ROI) and cost-effectiveness of public health programmes | Public Health England

This guide provides links to tools and reports that can help:

  • assess which interventions provide the best value for money, by calculating their costs, benefits and ROI
  • make the most of your budget by deciding how to split resources across different public health programmes
  • compare costs, savings and clinical outcomes

These evidence resources are relevant for local decision makers as well as national policymakers.  The resources have been updated in May 2018, and can be used to estimate the value of investing in prevention and early diagnosis in your area. They pull together the best available evidence on costs, savings, and health benefits for specific topic areas in a single place, thus simplifying the process of commissioning cost-effective services.

The interactive tools produced by PHE are:

Full detail at Public Health England

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Best start in life: cost-effective commissioning

A tool to help local commissioners provide cost-effective interventions for children aged up to 5 and pregnant women | Public Health England

This return on investment tool pulls together evidence on the effectiveness and associated costs for a number of interventions aimed at providing children with the best start in life.

The interactive resource allows results to be tailored to local situations based on the knowledge of the user. The tool is accompanied by a report providing further details on how the tool was constructed.

Local authorities and clinical commissioning groups can use results from the tool to protect and improve the health of their local populations when making commissioning decisions.

Falls prevention: cost-effective commissioning

Public Health England, 15 February 2018

The return on investment tool pulls together evidence on the effectiveness and associated costs for interventions aimed at preventing falls in older people living in the community. The flexible Excel sheet allows for results to be tailored to the local situation based on the knowledge of the user. All interventions are aimed at those aged 65 and over.

The tool comes with an accompanying report, which details how the tool was constructed and presents the main results.

The second report summarises the findings from a literature review carried out to identify cost-effective interventions.

Local authorities and Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) can use results from the tool to protect and improve the health of their local populations when making commissioning decisions.

Musculoskeletal conditions: return on investment tool

Return on Investment of Interventions for the Prevention and Treatment of Musculoskeletal Conditions | Public Health England

This tool has been designed to aid healthcare commissioners and providers in England who wish to assess the cost-effectiveness of interventions for the prevention musculoskeletal (MSK) conditions.

It is hoped that the tool will aid decision-making and increase the uptake of cost-effective interventions aimed at the prevention of MSK conditions. Conditions within the scope of this tool are: Lower back pain; chronic knee pain and osteoarthritis (hip and knee).

Full detail at Public Health England

Alcohol, drugs and tobacco: commissioning support pack

Annually updated alcohol, drugs and tobacco commissioning support pack for local authorities | Public Health England

This commissioning support pack will help local authorities to develop joint strategic needs assessment and local joint health and wellbeing strategies which effectively address public health issues relating to alcohol, drug and tobacco use.

The pack covers 4 topics, which are:

  • planning alcohol harm prevention, treatment and recovery in adults
  • planning drugs prevention, treatment and recovery in adults
  • planning comprehensive interventions for young people
  • planning comprehensive local tobacco control interventions

For each of these topics, there are:

  • a set of good practice principles and indicators to help local areas assess need and plan and commission effective services and interventions
  • bespoke data for each local area to help them commission effective services and interventions

Documents available via Public Health England

Sexual Health, Reproductive Health And HIV: A Review Of Commissioning

This report outlines the findings of a 2016 survey, carried out jointly with the Association of Directors of Public Health, which aimed to gain a clear picture of the commissioning arrangements for sexual health, reproductive health and HIV services | PHE

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The survey found that whilst there has been progress in improving services and the development of collaborative approaches there is also evidence of structural concerns which have the potential to impede effective commissioning. Key findings from the survey highlight the fragmentation of commissioning, barriers to access for those at greatest risk, increasing financial pressures and patient demand, and workforce concerns.

Mental health services: cost-effective commissioning

Return on investment resources to support local commissioners in designing and implementing mental health and wellbeing support services. | Public Health England

Public Health England has produced a series of resources around mental health services.

The commissioning report summarizes the evidence on promoting good mental health and reducing the impact of poor mental health, generated through a rapid evidence review.

The return on investment (ROI) tool and user guide:

  • builds on the evidence in the commissioning report
  • can be adapted to local conditions
  • presents results showing the economic benefits of each intervention
  • show you how to use the ROI tool

The barriers and facilitator report identifies issues that can make the commissioning of mental health and wellbeing interventions easier or more difficult in a local area.

Local authorities, clinical commissioning groups, Health and Wellbeing Boards and their local partners (for example schools, employers, police) can use these set of resources to improve the provision of mental health services.

The documnets can be accessedd via Public Health England