Child sexual exploitation: prevention and intervention

Evidence summary and framework to support local public health leaders to prevent and intervene early in cases of child sexual exploitation | PHE

This report summarises the emerging evidence from the UK on the issue of child sexual exploitation. It provides practice examples to support local public health leaders to establish a public health framework for prevention and intervention.

The literature search is a summary of the latest international research about effective interventions to prevent child sexual abuse and child sexual exploitation.

The primary audiences for these document are directors of public health and local public health teams. Other interested audiences may include NHS services, local councillors, head teachers and college principals, local children and young people’s services and commissioners, and voluntary and community organisations.

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Child sexual exploitation: prevention and intervention

Evidence summary and framework to support local public health leaders to prevent and intervene early in cases of child sexual exploitation.

This report summarises the emerging evidence from the UK on the issue of child sexual exploitation. It provides practice examples to support local public health leaders to establish a public health framework for prevention and intervention.

The literature search is a summary of the latest international research about effective interventions to prevent child sexual abuse and child sexual exploitation.

Children who witness violence or are sexually abused are more likely to inject drugs as adults

ScienceDaily | Published online: 2 November 2016

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Researchers from NYU School of Medicine and The Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research used a nationally representative sample of more than 12,000 Americans to explore associations between nine childhood traumas and adult drug use. Additionally: the association between sexual abuse during childhood and injection drug use was more than seven times as strong for males as females.

“Screening for and addressing childhood trauma may be an important strategy to prevent initiation of drug use,” said lead researcher Kelly Quinn, PhD, MPH, assistant professor at NYU School of Medicine’s Department of Population Health. “And for drug users, trauma-informed interventions throughout the life course are important for treatment and mitigation of relapse.”

Additionally, data found that neglect, emotional abuse, parental incarceration and parental binge drinking were associated with 25-55 percent increased odds of prescription pain reliever misuse.

Read the full research overview here

NICE issues guidance on inappropriate sexual behaviour in children

NICE | Published online September 2016

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This guideline covers children and young people who display harmful sexual behaviour, including those on remand or serving community or custodial sentences. It aims to ensure these problems don’t escalate and possibly lead to them being charged with a sexual offence. It also aims to ensure no-one is unnecessarily referred to specialist services.

‘Young people’ refers mainly to those aged 10 to 18 but also includes people up to 25 with special educational needs or a disability.

This guideline does not discuss people who have experienced sexual abuse. NICE will publish a guideline on child abuse and neglect in September 2017.

Recommendations

This guideline includes recommendations on:

Read the full guideline here

How can children’s services tackle child exploitation? Live Q&A

Join a panel of experts on Monday 29 February to discuss the challenges child sexual exploitation, trafficking and radicalisation present to social workers, children’s services and other agencies

CSE exists within a wider context of exploitation of children. Child trafficking is also an increasing issue of concern, where children are moved from one country to another, or between different parts of the UK, in order to be exploited or forced into work. And another area beginning to affect children’s services is radicalisation, where young people are drawn into terrorism. Since the government released its Prevent agenda (pdf) last year, schools and childcare providers have a statutory duty to have “due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism”. But a Community Care poll in December 2015 found that more than half (54%) of social workers surveyed were not confident in their knowledge of the correct intervention in a radicalisation case.

To discuss some of these issues, we’ve put together a panel of experts from the social care sector. We’ll be looking at:

  • How CSE, radicalisation and trafficking are affecting practice.
  • What social workers and other practitioners need to know about these issues.
  • The challenges facing practitioners and services.
  • How different agencies – such as children’s services, schools, healthcare services and the police – can work together to tackle child exploitation.

The discussion will take place on Monday 29 February between 12 and 2pm in the comments section below this article. Taking part is easier than ever: you can create a free Guardian account, or log in using your Twitter or Facebook profiles to comment. Alternatively, you can email us to post your questions for you.