New liver disease data shows major variation across England

The rate of people dying early from liver disease in some parts of England is almost 8 times higher than others. | Public Health England

New data published by Public Health England (PHE) shows a wide variation of premature mortality rates from liver disease across England.

Liver disease is almost entirely preventable with the major risk factors, alcohol, obesity and Hepatitis B and C, accounting for up to 90% of cases. The atlas will help health professionals to allocate their resources to improve patient outcomes.

The atlas shows premature mortality rates – dying before the age of 75 – ranged from 3.9 per 100,000 in South Norfolk clinical commissioning group (CCG) to 30.1 per 100,000 in Blackpool CCG, a 7.7 fold difference.

The atlas paints a mixed picture, with 10 indicators showing improvements including a reduction of premature deaths and fewer alcohol-specific hospital admissions for under 18s.

Nine of the indicators have become worse over time, including a doubling of hospital admission rates for cirrhosis from 54.8 per 100,000 to 108.4 per 100,000 people over the past decade. This indicator also varies significantly across the country with an 8.5 fold variation across CCGs and this gap has widened over the past decade.

The 2nd Atlas of Variation in risk factors and healthcare for liver disease in England will be published on the PHE fingertips website.

Advertisements

Supporting local action on health inequalities

Reducing health inequalities is at the heart of public health and PHE’s priorities | Public Health Matters Blog

Recent media headlines have further confirmed the extent of their impact on people’s lives and health, including the stark divides between different parts of the country and between different groups of people.

Today in England, people living in the least deprived areas of the country live around 20 years longer in good health than people in the most deprived areas, with some of the greatest need concentrated in large parts of the north of England.

As part of our efforts to address this situation we’ve published “Reducing health inequalities: system scale and sustainability”, together with an introduction summary  to support local action on health inequalities.

Read the full blog post here

Deprivation strongly linked to mortality

Report from the Office for National Statistics reveals “sizeable and highly significant” absolute and relative inequalities in avoidable mortality between those living in the most and least deprived areas.

windows-1234473_1920.jpg

Main points

  • Avoidable, amenable and preventable mortality is strongly related to area deprivation in England and in Wales.
  • In England in 2015 there were 16,686 deaths from avoidable causes in the most deprived areas whereas there were less than half that number (7,247 deaths) in the least deprived areas.
  • In the most deprived areas of Wales there were 1,054 deaths from avoidable causes in 2015, compared with 509 deaths in the least deprived areas.
  • Absolute and relative inequalities in avoidable mortality between those living in the most and least deprived areas were sizeable and highly significant, but the excess was larger for males than females in all cases.
  • The largest relative inequality in avoidable mortality was for deaths from respiratory diseases which were 4.8 times (males) and 7.7 times (females) more likely in the most deprived populations compared with the least deprived.
  • The largest absolute difference in avoidable mortality between the most and least deprived deciles was from cardiovascular disease and cancer.

Full report: Measuring Socioeconomic inequalities in avoidable mortality in England and Wales: 2015

Psychosocial pathways and health outcomes

Overview of current evidence about the relationships between social determinants, psychosocial factors and health outcomes. | Public Health England

This report highlights the current evidence that exists about the relationships between social determinants, psychosocial factors and health outcomes.

It also provides a conceptual framework that focuses on the psychosocial pathways between factors associated with social, economic and environmental conditions, psychological and psychobiological processes, health behaviours and mental and physical health outcomes.

North-South health divide bigger than ever with alarming rise in deaths of northern 25-44 year olds

Dying early (under age 75) is 20% more likely in northern compared with southern England according to research led by The University of Manchester

railway-1758208_960_720

The study uncovers a North-South divide in deaths among middle aged adults, which has been rising since the mid-90s and is now at alarming levels:

  • 49% more deaths among 35-44 year olds in the North in 2015
  • 29% more deaths among 25-34 year olds in the North in 2015

The team shows that a sharp increase in premature deaths among middle aged adults in the North first emerged in the mid-90s, increasingly quickly but consistently until the end of the study period in 2015.

Podcast: What’s going on with life expectancy?

The increase in life expectancy in England has almost “ground to a halt” since 2010 and austerity measures are likely to be a significant contributor | BMJ Talk Medicine

In this podcast Michael Marmot, director at University College London’s Institute of Health Equity, joins us to discuss what might be causing that drop off, and why a decrease in early life chances is particularly problematic.

Read more about the report here

Reducing health inequalities: Marmot indicators 2017

This briefing provides an update on progress since the 2008 Marmot Review into the most effective evidence-based strategies for reducing health inequalities in England. | The Institute of Health Equity 

This update finds that improvements on life expectancy at birth and remaining life expectancy at 65 have slowed since 2010. The analysis also finds that inequalities within and between local authorities have persisted.

Full document: Marmot Indicators Briefing 2017 – updated

Additional links: BBC News report | AgeUK