Health equity in England

A report on health equity in England focusing on inequalities between ethnic groups.

Are we living longer?

Health profile for England. A report combining Public Health England (PHE) data and knowledge on the health of the population in England in 2017.

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This report focuses on the question ‘are we living longer, and are the extra years spent in good or bad health?’.

It summarises and interprets current trends in health outcomes in England, in particular:

  • life expectancy
  • health life expectancy
  • morbidity
  • mortality

It explores the impact of risk factors on these health outcomes and considers how England compares with other developed countries. It summarises inequalities in outcomes and the impact of the social determinants of health.

The 7 chapters can be read alone or as a series:

  1. Life expectancy, healthy life expectancy and years lived in poor health
  2. Major causes of death and how they have changed
  3. Trends in morbidity and risk factors
  4. European comparisons
  5. Health inequalities
  6. Social determinants of health
  7. Emerging health protection issues

Full report available here

Public Health England Business Plan 2017 to 2018

Public Health England (PHE) has published their business plan for 2017/2018.

PHE Annual Business Plan

image source: https://www.gov.uk

Reviewing Public Health England

This tailored review looks at Public Health England’s performance and effectiveness, efficiency, and governance. It examines:

  • whether PHE performs necessary functions
  • whether these functions are delivered effectively
  • how issues are prioritised and how well PHE performs
  • whether PHE is efficient and provides good value for money
  • whether the governance processes are appropriate and effective

The main conclusion of the review was that Public Health England performs necessary functions and should continue to operate as an executive agency. The review report also contains recommendations to improve performance, governance and efficiency.

Full document: Tailored review of Public Health England

Health matters: obesity and the food environment

This resource outlines how councils and partners can help small food outlets and schools offer healthier food to reduce obesity levels | Public Health England

Nearly two-thirds of adults (63%) in England were classed as being overweight or obese in 2015.  In England, the proportion who were categorised as obese increased from 13.2% of men in 1993 to 26.9% in 2015 and from 16.4% of women in 1993 to 26.8% in 2015. The rate of increase has slowed down since 2001, although the trend is still upwards.

In 2015 to 2016, 19.8% of children aged 10 to 11 were obese and a further 14.3% were overweight. Of children aged 4 to 5, 9.3% were obese and another 12.8% were overweight. This means a third of 10 to 11 year olds and over a fifth of 4 to 5 year olds were overweight or obese.  In summary, nearly a third of children aged 2 to 15 are overweight or obese and younger generations are becoming obese at earlier ages and staying obese for longer.

Health matters: obesity and the food environment covers the following:

Scale of the obesity problem

Factors behind the rise in obesity levels

Improving everyone’s access to healthier food choices

How local authorities can help businesses offer healthier food and drink

National policies to tackle obesity

Call to action

5 Local food

Image source: http://www.gov.uk

Encouraging healthier ‘out of home’ food provision

This toolkit helps local authorities and businesses to provide and promote healthier options for food eaten away from home. | Public Health England

7 ways to encourage

Image source: http://www.gov.uk

The PHE toolkit, ‘Strategies for encouraging healthier “out of home” food provision’ has been developed to encourage local intervention that will further increase the opportunities for communities to access healthier food whilst out and about in their local community. It outlines opportunities both to manage new business applications and to work with existing food outlets to provide healthier food.

The toolkit has been created to help local authorities across England work with smaller food outlets such as:

  • takeaways
  • restaurants
  • bakers
  • sandwich and coffee shops
  • mobile traders
  • market stalls
  • corner shops
  • leisure centres
  • children’s centres and private nurseries

Full document:
Strategies for Encouraging Healthier ‘Out of Home’ Food Provision A toolkit for local councils working with small food businesses

Suicide prevalence in Engalnd by occupation

Office for National Statistics (ONS) analysis reveals which professions have the highest risk of suicide. | Public Health England | ONS

An analysis of ONS suicide prevalence statistics for 2011 to 2015 has been carried out to gain a better understanding of factors that influence suicide, in order to inform the government’s Suicide Prevention Strategy and help identify where inequalities exist amongst different groups.

The new ONS analysis shows that suicides are less common for females than males, and that there are differences in the types of occupation where suicide is more common. For women, occupations with a high risk of suicide include nurses (23% above the national average), primary school teachers (42% above average) and those working in culture, media and sport (69% above average).

For men, low skilled labourers in construction had a risk that was 3 times higher than that the average for England; men working in skilled construction jobs also had an increased risk. Both male and female care workers have a risk of suicide that was almost twice the national average.

To coincide with this publication, Public Health England, Business in the Community (BITC) and Samaritans have joined forces to produce toolkits for employers on how to prevent suicide and how to minimise the impact when it does happen.

The toolkits produced by PHE, BITC and Samaritans include advice on steps employers can take action to prevent suicides and support them and their teams when responding to the death of an employee caused by suicide.

Download the suicide prevention toolkit for employers.

Download the suicide postvention toolkit for employers.