Smoking bans having positive impact on child health

Faber, T. et al. Effect of tobacco control policies on perinatal and child health: a systematic review and meta-analysis. The Lancet Public Health. Volume 2, No. 9, e420–e437, September 2017

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A global study published in The Lancet Public Health journal has concluded that Child health has improved significantly since the introduction of public smoking bans in many countries.  The systematic review and meta-analysis showed that rates of children needing hospital care for severe chest infections have fallen by more than 18% since anti-smoking laws were introduced.

In line with earlier research, the study authors estimated that severe asthma attacks had fallen by almost 10% while the number of babies born prematurely had dropped by around 4% overall.

Raising taxes on tobacco products may also have improved child health, the researchers said, but the findings were less conclusive.

Full article available here

Related: Smoke-free policy and child health

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Experimental vaping does not turn into regular use among young people

Surveys across the UK show most e-cigarette experimentation does not turn into regular use | International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health| Story via OnMedica

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A study, which questioned more than 60,000 young people, found that most e-cigarette experimentation among young people does not turn into regular use. The findings also revealed that levels of regular vaping in young people who have never smoked remains very low.

The work which was part-funded by Cancer Research UK is a collaboration between the UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, Public Health England, Action on Smoking and Health (ASH), and the DECIPHer Centre at the University of Cardiff.

Full reference: Bauld, L. et al.  Young People’s Use of E-Cigarettes across the United Kingdom: Findings from Five Surveys 2015–2017. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 973.

 

Protecting children from tobacco

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The World Health Organization European Region has published Tobacco-free generations: protecting children from tobacco in the WHO European Region.

This report highlights ongoing and emerging tobacco-related issues that affect children in Europe and examines the regulatory frameworks, commitments and other tools that countries should use to protect children from tobacco. This also includes more novel approaches that could be used to pave the way towards a tobacco-free European Region.

Tobacco control playbook

This resource highlights the arguments and approaches that leaders in health systems across Europe have developed and used to counteract and succeed against the tobacco industry. |WHO Europe

The Tobacco Control Playbook has been developed by collecting numerous evidence-based arguments from different thematic areas, reflecting the challenges that tobacco control leaders have faced while implementing various articles of the WHO FCTC and highlighting arguments they have developed in order to counter and succeed against the tobacco industry.

This is the start of what is intended to be a living document, which will be updated and extended with further arguments and on the basis of feedback, as well as any developments in tobacco industry approaches. Everyone concerned with tobacco control is invited to contribute to its success by continuing to offer arguments and responses, and sharing their experiences through a dedicated website.

UK heart disease deaths fall by over 20% since indoor smoking ban

Smokers aged 35 and above are less likely to die from heart attacks since indoor venues went smoke-free 10 years ago | The Guardian

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Deaths from heart disease and strokes caused by smoking have fallen dramatically since lighting up in pubs, restaurants and other enclosed public places in England was banned 10 years ago.

New figures have shown that the number of smokers aged 35 and over dying from heart attacks and other cardiac conditions has dropped by over 20% since 2007 while fatalities from a stroke are almost 14% down.

The statistics, which Public Health England (PHE) has shared with the Guardian, come as medical, public health and anti-tobacco groups prepare to mark the 10th anniversary next Friday of smoking being prohibited in indoor public places by Tony Blair’s Labour government on 1 July 2007.

Figures collected by PHE’s Local Tobacco Control Profiles network show that while there were 32,548 deaths from heart disease attributable to smoking in 2007-09, there were 25,777 between 2013 and 2015 – a fall of 20.8%. Similarly, a total of 9,743 smokers died from a stroke in 2007-09, but fewer – 8,334 – between 2013 and 2015, a drop of 14.5%.

Read the full news story here

Adult smoking habits in the UK: 2016

Cigarette smoking among adults including the proportion of people who smoke including demographic breakdowns, changes over time, and e-cigarettes. | Office for National Statistics

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Main points

  • In 2016, of all adult survey respondents in the UK, 15.8% smoked which equates to around 7.6 million in the population.
  • Of the constituent countries, 15.5% of adults in England smoked; for Wales, this figure was 16.9%; Scotland, 17.7% and Northern Ireland, 18.1%.
  • In the UK, 17.7% of men were current smokers which was significantly higher in comparison with 14.1% of women.
  • Those aged 18 to 24 in the UK experienced the largest decline in smoking prevalence of 6.5 percentage points since 2010.
  • Among current smokers in Great Britain, men smoked 12.0 cigarettes each day on average whereas women smoked 11.0 cigarettes each day on average; these are some of the lowest levels observed since 1974.
  • In Great Britain, 5.6% of respondents in 2016 stated they currently used an e-cigarette in 2016, which equates to approximately 2.9 million people in the population.

Access the full document: Adult smoking habits in the UK: 2016

Cutting smoking rates could save NHS £67m a year

Study highlights the burden that smoking places on UK society, particularly on the poorest and least advantaged groups | OnMedica | Tobacco control

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If smoking rates dropped to 5% in the UK by 2035, the NHS could save £67 million in just one year. This is according to research published this week in Tobacco Control.

Researchers at the UK Health Forum, commissioned by Cancer Research UK, examined the health and economic impact of the UK becoming ‘tobacco-free’ – where less than 5% of the population smoke. The study predicts that achieving this target would avoid nearly 100,000 new cases of smoking-related disease, including 35,900 cancers over 20 years.

The impact of this health improvement amounts to a saving of £67 million in direct NHS and social care costs and an incredible £548 million in additional costs to the economy in 2035 alone.

If today’s trends continue, around 15% of people from the most deprived groups are predicted to smoke in 2035, compared to just 2.5% from the wealthiest.

Read more via OnMedica

Full reference: Hunt D, Knuchel-Takano A, Jaccard A, et al. Modelling the implications of reducing smoking prevalence: the public health and economic benefits of achieving a ‘tobacco-free’ UK