Healthier weight promotion

A set of training tools providing evidence-based healthy weight messages for health and social care professionals to give to children, young people and families | Public Health England

The resources consist of:

The target audience for these resources is health and care professionals but they will be accessible to the wider public health workforce. This suite of resources is part of Public Health England’s All Our Health ‘call to action’ for health and care professionals.

 

Advertisements

Evaluating weight management interventions

Evidence-based guidance to support the evaluation of weight management interventions | Public Health England

obese-3011213_1920

This document is an update of the ‘Standard Evaluation Framework (SEF) for weight management interventions’, (2009) which was originally published by the National Obesity Observatory, and is now widely used across England.

It has been updated as a result of feedback from practitioners in the field following a consultation exercise, and to provide support for the Weight management: guidance for commissioners and providers collection.

The document contains a list of ‘essential’ and ‘desirable’ criteria for data required for a comprehensive and robust evaluation. Essential criteria are the minimum data and information recommended to perform a basic evaluation of a weight management intervention. Desirable criteria are additional data that would improve the quality of an evaluation; and enhance understanding about what has been achieved and the processes that have taken place during the intervention.

Full document: Standard evaluation framework for weight management interventions

Calorie reduction programme

Steps to cut people’s excessive calorie intake have been unveiled by Public Health England (PHE), as part of the government’s strategy to cut childhood and adult obesity.

vegetables-1499906_1920

This report sets out the evidence on children’s calorie consumption and the details of the calorie reduction programme.

In terms of the evidence the report includes details of:

  • recommendations around calorie intakes, sources of calories and reported levels of intake
  • calculated estimates for daily energy intakes and excess calories consumed by children and adults
  • evidence on reformulation and portion size reduction; and public perceptions and attitudes to calories
  • estimated health economic benefits of a calorie reduction programme

For the calorie reduction programme, the reports sets out:

  • the overall ambition and structure of the programme
  • the food categories included
  • suggested mechanisms for action
  • timeline and next steps for PHE

Full report: Calorie reduction: the scope and ambition for action

Additional link: PHE news story

Community-based interventions for the treatment of overweight and obese adolescents

This systematic review aims to evaluate recent effective and scalable community-based weight management programs for adolescents (13–17 years) who are overweight or obese | Obesity Reviews

weight-2036971_1920 (2)

Adolescent obesity is a risk factor for obesity and other chronic disease in adulthood. Evidence for the effectiveness of community-based obesity treatment programs for adolescents is required to inform policy and clinical decisions.

Eight databases (Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Informit, and Scopus) were searched for studies published between January 2011–2 March 2017 which are scalable in a community setting and reported primary outcome measures relating to weight.

Following deduplication, 10,074 records were screened by title/abstract with 31 publications describing 21 programs included in this review. Reduction in adolescent BMIz ranged from 2 to 9% post-program and from 2 to 11% after varied lengths of follow-up. Study quality varied, and findings are limited by the risk of selection and retention bias in the included studies. Factors including the effectiveness and acceptability to the target population must be considered when selecting such community programs.

Full reference: Moores, J. et al. | A systematic review of community-based interventions for the treatment of adolescents with overweight and obesity | Obesity Reviews | 17 January 2018

Barriers and facilitators of a community-based childhood weight management programme

To explore the barriers and facilitators experienced by those implementing a government-funded, community-based childhood weight management programme | BMJ Open

https://www.flickr.com/photos/doublexuan/7381025596/
Image source: Jixuan Zhou – Flickr // CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Results: Most barriers occurred at the level of the organisational context. For all stakeholders, barriers arose due to the multidisciplinary nature of the programme, including the lack of role clarity and added complexity of working in different locations. Health professionals’ low-perceived self-efficacy in approaching the subject of weight with parents and parental resistance to hearing about their child’s weight status were barriers to programme implementation at the individual professional and patient levels, respectively. The main facilitators of implementation, occurring at the level of the health professional, included stakeholders’ recognition of the need for a weight management programme and personal interest in the area of childhood obesity. Having a local lead and supportive colleagues were further implementation drivers.

Conclusions: This study highlights the complexities associated with implementing a multidisciplinary childhood weight management programme, particularly translating such a programme to a community setting. Our results suggest the assignment of clear roles and responsibilities, the provision of sufficient practical training and resources, and organisational support play pivotal roles in overcoming barriers to change. This evidence can be used to develop an implementation plan to support the translation of interventions into real-world settings.

Full reference: Kelleher, E. et al (2017) Barriers and facilitators to the implementation of a community-based, multidisciplinary, family-focused childhood weight management programme in Ireland: a qualitative study. BMJ Open. 7:e016459.

Weight management services – why are they important?

Obesity is caused by a complex set of personal, social and environmental factors. It can come with a number of associated health consequences, all of which can have a huge impact on the individual, as well as the people around them | Public Health Matters Blog

scale-403585_960_720

But what impact does obesity have on our local population as a whole, and what part can local services play in addressing this issue?

PHE’s ‘Guide to Delivering and Commissioning Tier 2 Adult Weight Management Services’ supports local authorities, clinical commissioning groups and providers to develop and deliver weight management services that can help individuals achieve a healthier weight, while potentially contributing towards healthier communities.

Our guide, co-badged by NICE, LGA, ADPH and RCP, helps make the case for evidence-based services that are effective and accessible for users.

Some healthcare professionals are not comfortable discussing weight with patients, while others may doubt the efficacy of such services, meaning some patients might be missing out.

Our guide will help professionals engage with people across the obesity pathway, to ensure those referring into the service and those eligible to access services get all the support and information they need.

Read the full blog post here

National child measurement programme operational guidance

Guidance for local commissioners, providers and schools on running the national child measurement programme (NCMP) as part of the government’s commitment to tackling the public health challenge of excess weight.

tape-measure-2406650_1920 (1)

The publication of the Childhood Obesity Plan: A Plan for Action, in August 2016 shows that tackling child obesity is a priority for the Government. The plan aims to significantly reduce England’s rate of childhood obesity within the next ten years. Most local authorities have also identified addressing childhood obesity as a key issue in their health and wellbeing strategies, and reducing obesity is prioritised in many Sustainability and Transformation Plans.

The NCMP is key to monitoring the progress of the Government’s Childhood Obesity Plan. It provides the data for the Public Health Outcomes Framework indicators on “excess weight in children aged four to five years and ten to 11 years.” Because the data is valid at local level, it can also be used to inform the development and monitoring of local childhood obesity strategies.

National child measurement programme operational guidance

National child measurement programme: information for schools