Productive healthy ageing

This resource for health professionals and local authorities makes the case for action in midlife to support healthy productive later life | Public Health England

Longer, healthier lives are a benefit to society in many ways, including financial, social and cultural, because older people have skills, knowledge and experience that benefit the wider population. There is an opportunity to utilise this increased longevity as a resource, whilst challenging ageism and the view that retirement is about ‘sitting more and moving less’.

As life expectancy rises, we must promote the concept of productive healthy ageing, which involves:

  • improved health and wellbeing
  • increased independence and resilience to adversity
  • the ability to be financially secure through work and build resources
  • engagement in social activities
  • being socially connected with enhanced friendships and support
  • enjoying life in good health

Longer, healthier lives can be a benefit to society, but this requires over-65s to be more active community and economic participants.

Full detail at Public Health England

productive healthy ageing
Image Source: http://www.gov.uk
Advertisements

Preventing malnutrition in later life

State of the Nation: an overview of older people and malnutrition in the UK today | The Malnutrition Task Force. 

This report focuses on the scale and challenges of malnutrition in later life in the UK. Research shows that 1 in 10 people over the age of 65 are malnourished or at risk of malnutrition. This silent and often hidden condition can seriously affect an older person’s health and wellbeing and increase hospital admissions and long-term health problems.

mtf
Image source: http://www.malnutritiontaskforce.org.uk

The report examines the causes and consequences of malnutrition in the UK. It also looks at economic costs and pressures, and whether the NHS and social care services are currently able to support older people at risk and how invested they are in this issue.

It brings together information, statistics and evidence from across the health and social care system to highlight what is happening to older people who are malnourished or at risk of malnutrition in England.

Full report: State of the Nation: an overview of older people and malnutrition in the UK today 

Older people’s care survey

Older people’s care survey 2017 | The Family and Childcare Trust

hand-2906458_1920

This survey of local authorities and health and social care trusts examines whether enough care is provided in their areas and how much funding authorities and individuals have to pay for it.

The results indicate that over 4.2 million people aged 75 and over live in areas that do not have enough care to meet demand.  While 81 per cent of respondents said they had enough availability for care home places, the figure falls to 46 per cent for home care and 37 per cent for nursing homes with specialist dementia support.

The survey also found that local authorities pay an average of £556 per week per person, or almost £29,000 per year, for residential care.

Full document:  Older People’s Care Survey 2017

Spending constraints associated with a higher than expected number of deaths

Study published in the British Medical Journal suggests cuts to public funding of health and social care since 2010 could be linked to almost 120,000 excess deaths in England | BMJ | OnMedica

The study reports that between 2010 and 2014, the NHS in England had a real-term annual increase in funding of 1.3%, despite rising patient demand and healthcare costs. Real-term spend on social care has fallen by 1.19% every year during the same period.

Researchers compared actual death rates for 2011 to 2014 with those that would be expected, based on trends before spending cuts came into play, and taking account of national and economic factors, such as unemployment rates and pensions.

The researchers’ analysis of the data showed that between 2001 and 2010, deaths in England fell by an average of 0.77% every year, but rose by an average of 0.87% every year between 2011 and 2014.

The spending restraints were associated with 45,368 higher than expected numbers of deaths between 2010 and 2014 compared with equivalent trends before 2010.

Full reference: Watkins J. et al. |  Effects of health and social care spending constraints on mortality in England: a time trend analysis | BMJ Open 2017

Related: Excess deaths could be linked to health spending cuts

The Impact Of Homelessness On Health

New report warns that that the rising number of older homeless will create significant extra pressures for councils | Local Government Association

down-and-out-477546_1920

The Local Government Association (LGA) says that older homelessness is a growing hidden phenomenon that needs greater understanding.  Latest figures show that between April and June this year, councils accepted 620 people aged over 60 as homeless – at a rate of nearly 10 a day. This is up from the 270 accepted between October and December 2009, which was the lowest number since records began in 2005.

The LGA, which represents more than 370 councils in England and Wales, is warning that based on existing trends, this is set to double by 2025.

The LGA is calling for government to address the undersupply in specialist housing for older people, and an adaption to the implementation of welfare reforms to reduce the risk of homelessness. It says councils need to be able to borrow to invest in new council housing to increase supply, boost home ownership and reduce homelessness.

Full report: The Impact of Homelessness on Health: A guide for Local Authorities

 

Change in loneliness after intervention with cochlear implants or hearing aids

The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of hearing aid (HA) and cochlear implant (CI) use on loneliness in adults| The Laryngoscope

6846956824_d9210966ba_z
Image source: Joonas Tikkanen – Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0

One hundred and thirteen adults, aged ≥ 50 years, with postlingual hearing loss and receiving routine clinical care at a tertiary academic medical center, were evaluated with the University of California at Los Angeles Loneliness Scale before and 6 and 12 months after intervention with HAs or CIs. Change in score was assessed using linear mixed effect models adjusted for age; gender; education; and history of hypertension, diabetes, and smoking.

Treatment of hearing loss with CIs results in a significant reduction in loneliness symptoms. This improvement was not observed with HAs. We observed differential effects of treatment depending on the baseline loneliness score, with the greatest improvements observed in individuals with the most loneliness symptoms at baseline.

Full reference: Contrera, K.J. et al. (2017) Change in loneliness after intervention with cochlear implants or hearing aids. The Laryngoscope. Vol. 127 (Issue 8) pp. 1885–1889

Physical inactivity levels in adults aged 40 to 60 in England

Public Health England has released data on brisk walking levels and physical inactivity in people aged between 40 and 60 in England from 2015 to 2016.

walk-932965_1920

Data released by Public Health England (PHE) has shown that the amount of activity people do starts to tail off from the age of 40. PHE estimates 40% of 40- to 60-year-olds take a brisk 10-minute walk less frequently than once a month.

The analyses were carried out by PHE using data from Sport England’s Active Lives Survey, which is designed to measure participation in sport and physical activity in England.

PHE  say just 10 minutes a day could have a major impact, reducing the risk of early death by 15%. To help, the government agency is promoting a free app – Active 10 – which can monitor the amount of brisk walking an individual does and provide tips on how to incorporate more into the daily routine.

In addition, the PHE framework ‘Everybody active, every day’ has been updated. This framework aims to make active lifestyles a reality for all, with 4 areas for action which will:

  • change the social ‘norm’ to make physical activity the expectation
  • develop expertise and leadership within professionals and volunteers
  • create environments to support active lives
  • identify and up-scale successful programmes nationwide

Full document:
Everybody active, every day: an evidence-based approach to physical activity

Related: BBC News: Middle-aged told to walk faster

The Guardian: 6 million middle-aged people take no exercise